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Pam Gallina | Publisher

Food and Nutrition!

I recently began reducing anti-inflammatory’s in my diet, having experienced some joint and sciatica issues related to lifestyle and possibly age 😊, that my regular acupuncture, massage & chiropractic care, coupled with herbal supplements, wasn’t completely addressing. I realize that diet is where we should begin this work, but it always involves giving up most of the good stuff that is so bad for us and getting our palate used to eating healthy again. This month’s issue gives us food for thought as to why eating healthy is so important and shows us some alternatives to think about to make it more enjoyable.

In our feature titled “Down To Earth,” Sandra Yeyati shows us how intensive farming practices that maximize yields and profits are disrupting natural habitats, polluting the environment, and depleting soil so thoroughly that the United Nations estimates that only 60 growth cycles remain globally. But from ranchers in Mexico that holistically manage lifestock to North Dakota farmers that plant diverse crops integrated with ruminants and insects, those who work the land are finding ways to regenerate the soil with sustainable practices while still making a living. Innovations include no longer tilling the land, adopting solar energy, eliminating chemical fertilizers and pesticides, and raising crops to sell locally rather than the heavily subsidized grains that are exported.

In this month’s Conscious Eating section, April Thompson details how, with just a little light and creativity, we can begin “Indoor Edible Gardening” –how anyone can grow edible plants on a windowsill or countertop, putting fresh herbs, tomatoes and peppers just an arm’s reach away. Some crops like garlic, beets and carrots won’t reach maturity indoors, but can still be grown for their tasty greens. Both sprouts and microgreens, both easy to grow, are packed with 40 times the nutrients as their full-grown counterparts. Recipes are included for sprouted hummus; noodle soup with coconut, sprouts and shoots; and a green smoothie bowl.

Sandra Yeyati’s article titled “Hemp-Derived Cannabidiol,” shows us how CBD, the non-psychoactive part of the hemp plant, is gathering steam in health research since its legalization for growers two years ago. Already found useful for epilepsy, early data also shows CBD helps with chronic pain and insomnia, and promising studies on anxiety and depression are underway. The best approach for consumers who want to use CBD, say experts, is to start low and go slow, to use the right method to administer it, and to make sure quality control standards are met.

Most health-related problems originate with our diet. Regular body work is extremely important as well, but regrouping now and then and getting our diet back on track can head off many problems at their origin, before the pain can manifest. And, if we already have pain, trying some healthful alternatives is always a good course of action.

To conscious living,
Pamela Gallina, Publisher

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